Hilary Pfeifer

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Meet the Artist


  • About This Artist

    My training in ceramics, woodworking and metals gave me the skill set to explore the unexpected in my art. My recent sculptures combine laser cut aluminum, hardwoods, and subtly incorporate found objects as a decorative element. As a proud native of the Pacific Northwest, I try to use found or reclaimed materials whenever possible, leaving less of a footprint on the earth. The mark of the hand is important to me, and I believe it creates more meaningful art for those who live with it every day.

  • Q&A With This Artist

    A: I try to use reclaimed materials as often as possible, and being part of my local craft community means I get all kinds of nice discards from my furniture making friends. A few years back, I participated in an unusual artist's residency where five artists were given access to the city dump for six months to glean materials that would have gone to a landfill and make a body of work from it. Aside from finding a lot of nice hardwoods, I came upon a big stash of pencils one day and started using them as subtle design elements by embedding them into my sculptures. I live in a great city that has many different places to shop for weird reclaimed art materials. Having a craft-based educational training really gave me the ability to work with many different types of materials.

    A: I came to woodworking by way of several years of working in ceramics, and I really think my aesthetic choices came from that progression. I am really glad I landed on wood as my main material because there are so many directions one can go--type of wood, how you shape it, add and subtract to make forms--plus it's so accessible you can pretty much make art anywhere if you just have a pocketknife on hand!

    A: I have become an avid swimmer in the past few years- it's a great time to think about what is currently on my workbench, or the things I want to be on my workbench!



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