Blue Skies Workroom

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Meet the Artist


Headshot of Blue Skies Workroom
  • About This Artist

    Blue Skies Workroom is an exercise in radical optimism, the idea that in our chaotic everyday, acts of optimism are a bold force of will. As an artist and as a teacher, I strive to make joy and create beauty, to live within and bring others into this space. Each utilitarian, handmade object is a conversation between color, materials and design, creating opportunity for dialogue between user and article, to fill or to fondle.

  • Q&A With This Artist

    A: I design and sew using textiles I screen print in my studio. I generate screen-print stencils with hand-cut and hand-drawn paper. Primarily working with linen for heft, drape and sheen, I print with eco-friendly, water-based, upholstery-grade inks in colors I mix from pigments. Working, I consider how my choices – surface pattern, color combos, opacity, fabric, construction – will resolve in finished objects … but sometimes, I confess, I just fool around.

    A: I’ve always loved working with cloth and paper. My grandfather was a tailor in Flatbush, Brooklyn, and allowed me to touch voluptuous, luminous bolts of woolens lined like library books in his cutting room. As a girl, I learned to sew from my mother, and as an established artist, to screen print during a faculty retreat at Penland School of Craft. I even made my wedding dress. My favorite color is still fluorescent.

    A: I received an MBA from University of Chicago and served as artist-in-residence at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Business. I have two dozen chickens and a 27-year-old pet parrot.

    A: Marimekko! Vera! Indian block-print cottons and embellished silks. Persian, Oriental and tribal carpets. African and Dutch wax prints. Quilt repeats. These textiles of complexity and color, are foundational visual and tactile experiences for me and continue to feed my aesthetic and aspiration. Recently I’ve fallen for Charlie Porter’s book “What Artists Wear”.

    A: I love how what I make becomes about the person who uses it, about what they do with it, who they give it to as a gift, about its function into their world of living and working and love – and quickly ceases to be about me and its making.



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